Elisabetta L Faenza - Maximising Human Potential

FREE Report 2 - 7 Biggest Mistakes Influencers Makers

by Elisabetta L faenza

#1 Gossiping

Do you seek out the company of motivating, inspiring individuals, or do you fall into the trap of gravitating towards highly critical gossipers? Research shows that people who complain or gossip regularly are draining to be around, shutting down the DNA of those around them. If you want to positively influence others offer solutions not criticisms; uplift others, don't talk behind their backs.

#2 Being Attracted to Misery

Do you compete with others to express just how bad things are, and get satisfaction out of your own or others misery? If you do, chances are you'll gain a reputation as a negative person. Positive, constructive people will either avoid you or be brought down by you. When negative conversations begin, unless they are backed by facts, excuse yourself and seek out the company of more constructive individuals. Manage your own attitude positively and you will attract like-minded team mates. Take care not to celebrate the failures of your competitors, learn from their mistakes and demonstrate to your team you are prepared to learn and adapt, rather than gloat. What matters is what you and your team do, not what others fail to do.

#3 Overly Focusing on the Downside or the Upside

While it is important to acknowledge the downside of any situation, it is destructive to overly focus attention on negative scenarios. Do you help people to see the upside of a situation and encourage them to empower themselves when faced with adversity? Or, do you add your energy destructively to make the potential problem feel even worse? Conversely, focusing only on the upside and refusing to read signs to the contrary can create a culture of invincibility that is not based on reality.  This leads teams to sweep negative feedback under the carpet and marginalise any voice of reason. Create a culture where you plan for the best and are prepared for the worst, staying fluid and responsive to the shifting realities of the economic environment.

#4 Staying Aloof

When things are tough, many of us distance ourselves and shut down, going into denial. The behaviors that keep a team of people working toward success require connection. Do you make an effort to make eye-contact and say hello to people you regularly encounter at home, work or play, even when times are tough? If you do, you'll find people will value your opinion and be more willing to be in your company. Without communication and connection people will imagine the worst, feel overwhelmed and pour more negative energy into the situation, making a solution more difficult to find and implement.


#5 Passing the Buck

What you do when things go wrong is even more important than when things are going great. When a mistake is made do you pass the buck, blame others and shirk responsibility? This is not the behavior of an influential leader. Leaders with charisma are like the heroes of old; going into battle on behalf of their team, slaying dragons and admitting to their mistakes. If you are the team leader take blame off the table by owning it on the team’s behalf. You will gain trust and increase rapport with your team, freeing them up to be creative and productive again.

#6 Lack of Alignment

People love consistency. If you are a leader people can rely on, whose values are clear and up to scrutiny, your team will handle change more easily. Like a clear light, your alignment with your values acts as a beacon when things get tough, or the pressure to perform is high. Don't be an inflexible automaton, however. Be firm about what matters, the core principles of who you are and the ideals you represent, but allow flexibility of action within that. Ensure your organisation’s vision and mission statements are paid more than lip service, if they no longer relate to the values and goals of the organisation, be prepared to change them collaboratively.

#7Threatened by Talent

Are you the kind of leader who sees upcoming talent as a threat? Do you like to be the smartest person in the room? Research shows the most successful individuals surround themselves with talented people, not sycophants and yes-men. They understand that talent attracts success so they uplift and promote it; increasing their profit through fostering innovation and creativity. Talented X and Y Gens seek the opportunity to work autonomously and collaboratively, and will be attracted to these environments, regardless of level of compensation.

Elisabetta L. Faenza is the author of The Energy Code, get your copy today at:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Energy-Code-Activating-Productivity/dp/1628651121 /ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1405926866&sr=8-2&keywords=Elisabetta+L+Faenza.

pdfClick here to download a copy of Report 2

 

#1 Gossiping

Do you seek out the company of motivating, inspiring individuals, or do you fall into the trap of gravitating towards highly critical gossipers? Research shows that people who complain or gossip regularly are draining to be around, shutting down the DNA of those around them. If you want to positively influence others offer solutions not criticisms; uplift others, don't talk behind their backs.

#2 Being Attracted to Misery

Do you compete with others to express just how bad things are, and get satisfaction out of your own or others misery? If you do, chances are you'll gain a reputation as a negative person. Positive, constructive people will either avoid you or be brought down by you. When negative conversations begin, unless they are backed by facts, excuse yourself and seek out the company of more constructive individuals. Manage your own attitude positively and you will attract like-minded team mates. Take care not to celebrate the failures of your competitors, learn from their mistakes and demonstrate to your team you are prepared to learn and adapt, rather than gloat. What matters is what you and your team do, not what others fail to do.

#3 Overly Focusing on the Downside or the Upside

While it is important to acknowledge the downside of any situation, it is destructive to overly focus attention on negative scenarios. Do you help people to see the upside of a situation and encourage them to empower themselves when faced with adversity? Or, do you add your energy destructively to make the potential problem feel even worse? Conversely, focusing only on the upside and refusing to read signs to the contrary can create a culture of invincibility that is not based on reality.  This leads teams to sweep negative feedback under the carpet and marginalise any voice of reason. Create a culture where you plan for the best and are prepared for the worst, staying fluid and responsive to the shifting realities of the economic environment.

#4 Staying Aloof

When things are tough, many of us distance ourselves and shut down, going into denial. The behaviors that keep a team of people working toward success require connection. Do you make an effort to make eye-contact and say hello to people you regularly encounter at home, work or play, even when times are tough? If you do, you'll find people will value your opinion and be more willing to be in your company. Without communication and connection people will imagine the worst, feel overwhelmed and pour more negative energy into the situation, making a solution more difficult to find and implement.

Page | 1                             www.elisabettalfaenza.com ©2014 Elisabetta L Faenza



#5 Passing the Buck

What you do when things go wrong is even more important than when things are going great. When a mistake is made do you pass the buck, blame others and shirk responsibility? This is not the behavior of an influential leader. Leaders with charisma are like the heroes of old; going into battle on behalf of their team, slaying dragons and admitting to their mistakes. If you are the team leader take blame off the table by owning it on the team’s behalf. You will gain trust and increase rapport with your team, freeing them up to be creative and productive again.

#6 Lack of Alignment

People love consistency. If you are a leader people can rely on, whose values are clear and up to scrutiny, your team will handle change more easily. Like a clear light, your alignment with your values acts as a beacon when things get tough, or the pressure to perform is high. Don't be an inflexible automaton, however. Be firm about what matters, the core principles of who you are and the ideals you represent, but allow flexibility of action within that. Ensure your organisation’s vision and mission statements are paid more than lip service, if they no longer relate to the values and goals of the organisation, be prepared to change them collaboratively.

#7Threatened by Talent

Are you the kind of leader who sees upcoming talent as a threat? Do you like to be the smartest person in the room? Research shows the most successful individuals surround themselves with talented people, not sycophants and yes-men. They understand that talent attracts success so they uplift and promote it; increasing their profit through fostering innovation and creativity. Talented X and Y Gens seek the opportunity to work autonomously and collaboratively, and will be attracted to these environments, regardless of level of compensation.

Elisabetta L. Faenza is the author of The Energy Code. Get your copy today at:

 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Energy-Code-Activating-Productivity/dp/1628651121 /ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1405926866&sr=8-2&keywords=Elisabetta+L+Faenza.

 

pdfClick here to download a copy of Report 2

Contact Elisabetta

Please fill in the form below...
Full Name(*)
Please type your full name.
E-mail(*)
Invalid email address.
Enquiry
Invalid Input
Enter the Code(*) Enter the Code
Refresh
Invalid Input